Gen Now Week: Social Media, the Double-Edged Sword. Don’t Get Cut.

Written by on June 11, 2013 in Associates, Social Media Tip, USANA with 1 Comment

Editor’s Note: You’ve heard enough of us. It’s your turn to tell us about Gen Y. This is a guest blog written for USANA’s Generation Now Week by Soomin Kim, a USANA Ruby Director.

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“Let’s stay connected.”

That’s the line that I often catch myself exclaiming to others in person, over email, text, etc. It’s my way of communicating that I’m done with this conversation at this moment, but we can use technology — social media — to maintain an ongoing virtual relationship.

Seriously, I use “let’s stay connected” as much as Paris Hilton used “that’s hot.” Hmmm, trademark ideas…?

Social Media: A Game Changer

Look, we already know how connected social media has made us. How much it has absolutely changed the game for those looking to connect, market, inquire, and share.

  • Twitter has absolutely obliterated the degree of separation from you and your favorite celebrity.
  • Facebook has taken the term “too much information” to new heights. I mean, I know where you were last night, who you were with, what you ate, and how you felt about it … and I wasn’t necessarily interested in knowing any of it — your information just happened to be in my newsfeed.
  • With Instagram, like in the film Being John Malkovich, you can instantaneously live one’s life through the eyes of the beholder — and “filter.”

I am being partially comedic in my explanation and thoughts of these Internet platforms. But I am dead serious when I say: I would NOT be where I am in my business — in terms of success and productivity — if not for social media.

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Certainly I can see myself finding avenues to build a USANA business successfully without it, but given that I began network marketing just six years ago, I can’t imagine a world without such a platform and the accessibility of connectivity.

That said, not everyone understands how to utilize social media properly to build a business. I would go so far as to say most USANA Associates hurt themselves on Facebook more than they help.

I’ll explain what I mean by that in more detail on another blog and in person to those attending the inaugural USANA Generation Now Summit, June 14-15, in Las Vegas.

Social Media: A Double-Edged Sword

What I do want to talk about is the double-edged sword that is social media.

For all its benefits, including allowing us to connect with people around the world, social media also has created anxiety on unprecedented levels for Generation Y.

  • Immediacy: The constant concern for receiving immediate responses (text and driving, ignoring dinner partners, missing the movie, the conversation, etc.).
  • Approval: The anxiety of approval (did I obtain enough “likes” on a post, a tweet, or photo?).
  • Time Suck: The subconscious loss of time (vicariously living through others, AKA: “creeping,” refreshing news feeds, going on rabbit trails of observing profiles, etc.).

Many have become a victim of this constant need for approval. In short, it is simply a microcosm of real life — the need to belong, be accepted, be approved, and receive attention. It’s just on steroids with social media.

I mean let’s be real, there is something exhilarating about massive attention and approval, and certainly few things make your blood pressure rise faster than a public argument or disagreement on Facebook.

Most Important: Approval & Recognition

Here’s the core of what I’m trying to share: approval and recognition for Gen Y individuals carry more weight than does the opportunity to earn additional income.

It is something that is also simply a byproduct of success in USANA, or the network marketing industry as a whole. When I mention that many people use social media improperly to build their business, it’s usually — outside a lack of marketing knowledge — due to someone forcibly trying to bridge the gap between unsuccessful and wildly successful and widely recognized.

But there are no words, video, quotes, or links that can replace action, productivity, and results. Keep that in mind. That is also why the more successful you are, the longer leash you have on social media platforms.

If you look at people like Donald Trump or Robert Kiyosaki, their success is very well documented. That means they are less politically correct, and for all intents and purposes say whatever the heck they want. Without documented success, the reply is always “who are you to say that and what have you done!?”

Create and Foster a Community

Screen Shot 2013-05-21 at 1.18.02 PM copy gen yOK, circling back to the key point: When introducing others to the USANA vision, especially on social media, try this:

  1. Spend more time sharing about the community that is involved with this opportunity
  2. Discuss stories and how individuals are recognized
  3. Talk about how many new friends they will make automatically and how it feels being surrounded by positive individuals that support your success.

You simply cannot put a price on those intangibles — and that’s what makes USANA so great.

If people look to enroll in USANA or any similar opportunity with a limited view of success only being equated to money, then let me be the first to tell you that you will find many unsatisfied individuals.

Personally, I have seen so many new friendships made, opportunities gained, careers expanded, self-confidences bloated, and skills learned from hundreds of individuals I’ve personally worked with — all gained through a USANA partnership. And yes, several have made money as well!

A Powerful Tool for Business

Friends, social media coupled with the USANA business journey has shown me that individual needs are so evident. Share how some of these needs are met through the vision of what we are doing. And when you welcome a new teammate, you’ll want to let the Facebook world know. Here’s how:

  • Introduce them publicly to your team and community (with their approval)
  • “Friend suggest” them to other Associates.
  • Monitor their profile closely for the next two weeks and support any topic they post about. Demonstrate positive reinforcement. Send a private message to your leaders to do the same for your new teammate.
  • Share with them the different corporate USANA social media sites so they see the larger community as they embark on the sometimes-trying early stages of building the foundation of their business.

Simply by taking these steps immediately with new Associates — immediately tantalizing them with positivity, recognition, approval and community — you will find someone who finds value in the opportunity before even making their first check.  This also attracts their potential partners.

For all the worry and concerns that social media can create, it remains one business savvy way to turn the tide in your favor.

-The Ninja

Join the Generation Now Week conversation on Facebook and by using #USANAGenY on Twitter.

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About the Author: USANA Health Sciences develops and provides the highest quality, science-based health products, distributed internationally through network marketing, creating a rewarding financial opportunity for our Independent Associates, shareholders and employees. .

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